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San Francisco Giants: Best MLB draft picks of the 2000s

San Francisco Giants stars Buster Posey and Tim Lincecum. (Photo by Denis Poroy/Getty Images)
San Francisco Giants stars Buster Posey and Tim Lincecum. (Photo by Denis Poroy/Getty Images)
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San Francisco Giants stars Buster Posey and Tim Lincecum.
San Francisco Giants stars Buster Posey and Tim Lincecum. (Photo by Denis Poroy/Getty Images)

The San Francisco Giants haven’t always done the best in the MLB draft. But for a period of years about a decade ago, it seemed like they could do no wrong.

Looking through the list, you can see some of the best known Giants and some of the players who were huge contributors to the World Series titles in 2010, 2012, and 2014.

Among them were Tim Lincecum, Madison Bumgarner, Buster Posey, Brandon Crawford, and Brandon Belt, all of them picked between 2006-2009.

But before we get to the top picks, let’s take a look at the ones who just missed out.

San Francisco Giants Best Draft Picks of the 2000s

San Francisco Giants best draft picks honorable mentions

Sergio Romo

Sergio Romo was taken in the 28th round in 2005. He, too, earned three titles during his Giants career, recording three saves during the 2012 World Series to earn his spot among memorable players. Still pitching at age 37, now with the Twins, Romo’s top years were undoubtedly in San Francisco. With 84 saves and 498 strikeouts during his nine years in SF, he earned 9.2 of his career 10.5 WAR there.

Joe Panik

A first-round pick in 2011, Panik went 29th overall. He made his debut in 2014 and earned an All-Star nod in 2015. A year later he earned the NL Gold Glove at second base in 2016. Panik was released in August 2019, but racked up 7.5 WAR during his time with the Giants before that.

Tim Lincecum

Tim Lincecum was the Giant’s first pick in the 2006 draft, going 10th overall. During his career in San Francisco, Lincecum won three World Series titles and two NL Cy Young Awards, was named to the All-Star Game four times, and threw two no-hitters. Although he isn’t officially retired, he had 19.6 WAR for his career, exceeding that with 21.5 of that during his Bay Area years before going backward in Los Angeles.

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