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SF Giants History

Who is the Most Underrated San Francisco Giant of All-Time?

Jun 1992: Second baseman Robby Thompson of the San Francisco Giants leaps into the air as Tony Fernandez of the San Diego Padres slides toward the base beneath him. Mandatory Credit: Otto Greule /Allsport
Jun 1992: Second baseman Robby Thompson of the San Francisco Giants leaps into the air as Tony Fernandez of the San Diego Padres slides toward the base beneath him. Mandatory Credit: Otto Greule /Allsport /
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20 May 1993: Second baseman Robby Thompson of the San Francisco Giants leaps into the air as outfielder Bip Roberts of the Cincinnati Reds scrambles onto the base beneath him during a game at Candlestick Park in San Francisco, California. Mandatory Credit: Otto Greule /Allsport
20 May 1993: Second baseman Robby Thompson of the San Francisco Giants leaps into the air as outfielder Bip Roberts of the Cincinnati Reds scrambles onto the base beneath him during a game at Candlestick Park in San Francisco, California. Mandatory Credit: Otto Greule /Allsport /

Tom Haller

Tom Haller played his first seven seasons in San Francisco, from 1961-1967. Haller was a two time All-Star who may have been the best catcher in San Francisco Giants history. Buster Posey has since passed Haller on that depth chart, but there was no denying the impact Haller had behind the plate in the 1960’s for the Giants. Despite being a career .248 hitter for the Giants, Haller’s bat is what set him apart from other catchers.

In his first All-Star season in 1966, Haller finished with 27 home runs, 19 doubles and 67 RBI’s. In a rare trade between rivals, Haller was traded to the Los Angeles Dodgers before the 1968 season for Ron Hunt. It was the first time in nearly ten years that the two teams made a trade with each other on the West Coast.

Jim Ray Hart

Jimmy Ray Hart played 11 seasons for the Giants from 1963-1973. He burst onto the scene, finishing second in the Rookie of the Year balloting in 1964. The power hitting third baseman and outfielder had a slashline of .282/.348/.474 for an OPS of .823 as a Giant. The 1966 All-Star was often overshadowed by Hall of Famers Mays and McCovey.

Injuries hurt his career numbers as well. However, his 175 home runs as a Giant have not been forgotten by the organization or the fan base. Hart passed away in May of last year, but his memory will live on with Giants fans for generations.

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Robby Thompson

Robby Thompson ended up playing his entire 11 year career with the San Francisco Giants. From 1986-1993, the Giants knew who their everyday second baseman was. Thompson’s consistency at the plate and in the field solidified the Giants lineup and defense throughout Thompson’s first eight seasons in orange and black. Injuries kept him off the field from 1994-1996, when he eventually retired from the game.

Thompson was often taken for granted by fans for not being as flashy as Will Clark, Kevin Mitchell, Matt Williams or Barry Bonds. What Thompson did do was give the Giants a number two hitter and second baseman that did his job day in and day out.

The two time All-Star was a key member of the 1987 and 1989 teams that finally ended both a playoff and pennant droughts in San Francisco history and was also one of the best players in baseball for the 1993 Giants team that won 103 games.

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Thompson went to the Midsummer Classic in 1988 and 1993. His 1993 season was his best, slashing .312/.375/.496 for an incredible OPS of .870 and an OPS+ of 136.

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