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SF Giants farm system: Updated top 31 prospect rankings

DENVER, CO - JULY 11: Marco Luciano #10 of National League Futures Team bats against the American League Futures Team at Coors Field on July 11, 2021 in Denver, Colorado. (Photo by Dustin Bradford/Getty Images)
DENVER, CO - JULY 11: Marco Luciano #10 of National League Futures Team bats against the American League Futures Team at Coors Field on July 11, 2021 in Denver, Colorado. (Photo by Dustin Bradford/Getty Images)
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SF Giants, Luis Toribio
Former SF Giants infielder Abiatel Avelino slides under the tag of SF Giants prospect Luis Toribio during an intrasquad game at Oracle Park on July 15, 2020. (Photo by Ezra Shaw/Getty Images)

SF Giants prospects: Midseason 2021 rankings
23. Luis Toribio, 1B/3B

Age: 20
Highest Level: Low-A (San Jose)
Acquired: IFA (2017)
Future-Value Grade: 40+

Luis Toribio has long been held in high regard by those within the SF Giants organization and while his profile as a bat-first corner infielder without huge power comes with high risk, some evaluators pound the table for Toribio’s potential to be an everyday player.

The Giants have said they believe Toribio has plus power potential, and if so, he may have a higher ceiling than most give him credit for. However, in his first professional experience at a full-season affiliate, Toribio has struggled to excel at Low-A. Toribio’s advanced eye has helped him work 52 walks in 79 games, but he’s failed to consistently drive the ball, recording a .234/.354/.365 line.

Toribio has some similarities to early-career Max Muncy, who struggled to tap into power despite an excellent approach, but while Muncy has become an impact player with the Los Angeles Dodgers, it took him until his late-20s to reach that potential.

Toribio has already maxed out his 6’1” frame and is a below-average runner. He’s limited defensively but has a strong arm and should stick at the hot corner if he can improve his glovework. He could move to second base (similarly to Wilmer Flores), but his arm remains the best part of his defensive profile, which obviously has less value on the other side of the diamond. Some think he’ll have to move to first base down the line, but assuming he sticks at third, he has fringe everyday potential. Otherwise, Toribio could be a limited bench bat.

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