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SF Giants farm system: Updated top 31 prospect rankings

DENVER, CO - JULY 11: Marco Luciano #10 of National League Futures Team bats against the American League Futures Team at Coors Field on July 11, 2021 in Denver, Colorado. (Photo by Dustin Bradford/Getty Images)
DENVER, CO - JULY 11: Marco Luciano #10 of National League Futures Team bats against the American League Futures Team at Coors Field on July 11, 2021 in Denver, Colorado. (Photo by Dustin Bradford/Getty Images)
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SF Giants, Seth Corry
SF Giants pitching prospect Seth Corry with the Eugene Emeralds throws against Hillsboro with a player in third during the second inning at PK Park in Eugene.

SF Giants prospects: Midseason 2021 rankings
25. Seth Corry, LHP

Age: 22
Highest Level: High-A (Eugene)
Acquired: Draft (2017)
Future-Value Grade: 40+

Seth Corry was one of the ten best prospects in the system heading into the year, but his inconsistent control derailed his season at High-A Eugene and led the SF Giants to bring him back to their complex in Arizona before he returned to High-A last week.

Corry has missed bats from the onset of his pro career, striking out roughly a batter per inning at each level. However, he tended to walk roughly a batter per inning as well. In his full-season debut in 2019, Corry had a great 2.58 ERA and accrued 69 strikeouts in just 45.1 innings, but he had also issued 36 walks. Then a mechanical adjustment allowed him to take off.

From the start of July to the end of the 2020 season, Corry made 11 starts. During that span, he posted a 0.99 ERA in 63.2 innings, struck out 86, and allowed just 16 free passes. He still struggled to keep his pitch counts down and work deep into games, but avoiding walks was a significant step forward.

Corry’s changeup generated a whiff rate of 46% in 2019, and it has the potential to be another above-average or better pitch. His fastball once sat in the low-90s, but has sat around 93 mph this season and generates above-average spin rates. His curveball, though, remains his best pitch, averaging over 2,600 RPMs and generating whiffs at an elite rate throughout his career.

Corry has always had a better handle locating his offspeed pitches than his fastball, which tends to be a better sign than the reverse. However, he was unable to locate any of his pitches with consistency this year at Eugene. Corry has struck out more than 30% of opposing batters in 61.1 innings pitched this season, but he’s also surrendered 61 walks and a 6.60 ERA.

Corry has the stuff to be a solid mid-rotation arm, but finding consistent mechanics will be pivotal. Questions about Corry’s ability to stick in the rotation have always followed him, and his erratic 2021 has done nothing to alleviate those concerns. As with many pitchers throughout professional baseball, he will go as far as his control can take him.

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