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SF Giants: Six prospects who could make an impact this season

SCOTTSDALE, ARIZONA - MARCH 28: Kervin Castro #76 of the SF Giants pitches in the sixth inning against the Oakland Athletics during the MLB spring training game at Scottsdale Stadium on March 28, 2021 in Scottsdale, Arizona. (Photo by Abbie Parr/Getty Images)
SCOTTSDALE, ARIZONA - MARCH 28: Kervin Castro #76 of the SF Giants pitches in the sixth inning against the Oakland Athletics during the MLB spring training game at Scottsdale Stadium on March 28, 2021 in Scottsdale, Arizona. (Photo by Abbie Parr/Getty Images)
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SF Giants, Camilo Doval
SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA – MAY 07: Camilo Doval #75 of the SF Giants pitches against the San Diego Padres in the seventh inning at Oracle Park on May 07, 2021. The Giants won the game 5-4. (Photo by Thearon W. Henderson/Getty Images)

6 SF Giants prospects who could make an impact this season: 4. Camilo Doval

Camilo Doval was ranked the 31st best prospect in the organization heading into the season, but an impressive spring training performance earned him an early-season promotion to the MLB roster. The flamethrowing righty got off to a strong start but ultimately recorded an ERA north of 7.00 across 10.2 innings pitched while surrendering six walks and four home runs before he was optioned to Triple-A.

Control and consistency have always been a problem for Doval. He’s clearly taken massive strides since 2019, but that does not mean he’s ready to be in a big-league bullpen, particularly one in a pennant race. While he’s been effective in a pair of spot callups since his first big-league stint, his numbers at Sacramento show all the rough edges. Doval has struck out 34 hitters across 25.1 innings pitched but recorded a 5.33 ERA with 22 walks.

Even with all the reasons to suggest the Giants should pass on recalling Doval this season, there’s arguably enough upside to justify the risk. He has elite closer upside with one of the nastiest pitching arsenals in the organization. Doval works from a funky three-quarters delivery, making it particularly difficult for right-handed hitters to pick up his pitches. He frisbees in a high 90s four-seamer that registers strong spin rates and a 88-92 mph cutter/slider with nasty late horizontal movement.

Doval’s velocity had major fluctuations early in his career but has stabilized over the past year. It appears that he’s found an even higher gear this season, consistently topping 100 mph and even throwing a pitch that clocked in at 104.5 mph. Needless to say, if Camilo Doval can find just a bit more consistent command, he could very easily find a role facing off against tough right-handed hitters out of the Giants bullpen.

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