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SF Giants Prospects

SF Giants Prospects: 2021 Preseason Top 31 Rankings

Joey Bart #21 of the SF Giants looks on walking back to his position against the Arizona Diamondbacks in the top of the eighth inning at Oracle Park on September 07, 2020. (Photo by Thearon W. Henderson/Getty Images)
Joey Bart #21 of the SF Giants looks on walking back to his position against the Arizona Diamondbacks in the top of the eighth inning at Oracle Park on September 07, 2020. (Photo by Thearon W. Henderson/Getty Images)
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SF Giants, Luis Toribio
Former SF Giants infielder Abiatel Avelino slides under the tag of SF Giants prospect Luis Toribio during an intrasquad game at Oracle Park on July 15, 2020, in San Francisco, California. (Photo by Ezra Shaw/Getty Images)

SF Giants top prospects: No. 9 — 3B Luis Toribio

Age: 20
Highest Level: Low-A (Salem-Keizer)
Acquired: IFA (2017)
Future-Value Grade: 45+

Luis Toribio has long been held in high regard by those within the SF Giants organization. He’s shown the maturity of a player far older than him for some time, and even though he’s still just 20-years old, he could be one of the quickest movers of the system’s prospects.

The Giants have said they believe Toribio has plus power potential, and if so, he may have a higher ceiling than most give him credit for. I’ve long projected an above-average hit/power combination as his ceiling with the potential for both to play up because of his elite eye and approach.

Toribio’s early results stateside were quite positive. Between rookie ball and Salem-Keizer, he hit .296/.433/.454 and continued to show his ability to work strong plate appearances against older competition. Toribio has some similarities to former Giants prospect Bryan Reynolds, who similarly struggled to tap into his power potential but posted impressive on-base percentages. Without Reynolds’ outfield defense to fall back on, Toribio will need to find more consistent power output to be an everyday player. Otherwise, he’ll be limited to a platoon or bench role.

Toribio has already maxed out his 6’1” frame. A below-average runner, Toribio is limited defensively but has a strong arm and should stick at the hot corner if he can improve his glovework. He could move to second base (similarly to Wilmer Flores), but his arm remains the best part of his defensive profile, which obviously has less value on the other side of the infield. Some think he’ll have to move to first base down the line, but assuming he sticks at third, he has everyday potential.

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