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SF Giants Rumors

San Francisco Giants: Three sleeper free-agent starting pitcher targets

Nick San Miguel
ARLINGTON, TEXAS - MAY 30: Shelby Miller #19 of the Texas Rangers throws against the Kansas City Royals in the eighth inning at Globe Life Park in Arlington on May 30, 2019 in Arlington, Texas. (Photo by Ronald Martinez/Getty Images)
ARLINGTON, TEXAS - MAY 30: Shelby Miller #19 of the Texas Rangers throws against the Kansas City Royals in the eighth inning at Globe Life Park in Arlington on May 30, 2019 in Arlington, Texas. (Photo by Ronald Martinez/Getty Images)
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ARLINGTON, TEXAS – JUNE 19: Shelby Miller #19 of the Texas Rangers throws against the Cleveland Indians in the eighth inning at Globe Life Park in Arlington on June 19, 2019 in Arlington, Texas. (Photo by Ronald Martinez/Getty Images)
ARLINGTON, TEXAS – JUNE 19: Shelby Miller #19 of the Texas Rangers throws against the Cleveland Indians in the eighth inning at Globe Life Park in Arlington on June 19, 2019 in Arlington, Texas. (Photo by Ronald Martinez/Getty Images)

RHP Shelby Miller

An All-Star in 2015 with the Atlanta Braves, Shelby Miller was once a promising young starter that the Braves and Diamondbacks both paid a steep price to acquire via trade.

However, over the past few years, he has hit some bumps in the road.

During his peak season in 2015, he posted a 2.07 ERA during the first half of the season, and he finished the year with a 3.02 ERA in 205.1 innings, albeit with an ugly 6-17 record.

Maybe when Miller retires, he and Matt Cain can go grab a few drinks and share old war stories about getting absolutely no run support.

After that strong 2015 season, he was traded to the Diamondbacks in exchange for top prospect Dansby Swanson and established outfielder Ender Inciarte in a move that looks pretty misguided in retrospect.

Miller was injured for part of his time in his first year with the Diamondbacks, but when he was healthy enough to pitch, he struggled to the point that he was sent him down to Triple A. He finished the season with a 3-12 record and a 6.15 ERA in 20 starts.

He made just four starts in 2017 before undergoing Tommy John surgery and his recovery limited him to just five appearances the following season, in what was essentially two lost years.

The D-backs non-tendered him last offseason and the Texas Rangers took a chance on him returning to form. However, he struggled to an 8.49 ERA in 44 innings before he was released.

So, after all those ugly numbers, you’re probably wondering why the Giants should take a chance on this guy. Well, he is only 29 years, so his career is far from over, and there is still plenty of time for him to turn things around.

He’ll also come cheap, so there is very little risk and a fair amount of reward if he is able to regain anything close to his previous form.

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