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Comparing Springs: Where the San Francisco Giants core finished

SCOTTSDALE, AZ - FEBRUARY 21: Buster Posey #28 of the San Francisco Giants poses during the Giants Photo Day on February 21, 2019 in Scottsdale, Arizona. (Photo by Jamie Schwaberow/Getty Images)
SCOTTSDALE, AZ - FEBRUARY 21: Buster Posey #28 of the San Francisco Giants poses during the Giants Photo Day on February 21, 2019 in Scottsdale, Arizona. (Photo by Jamie Schwaberow/Getty Images)
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San Francisco Giants
SCOTTSDALE, AZ – FEBRUARY 21: Mac Williamson #51 of the San Francisco Giants poses during the Giants Photo Day on February 21, 2019 in Scottsdale, Arizona. (Photo by Jamie Schwaberow/Getty Images)

Mac Williamson

2019 Spring Training: .237/.286/.322, 1 HR, 5 RBI, 18 SO, 2 BB
Average Spring Training: .297/.357/.554, 2 HR, 6 RBI, 9 SO, 2 BB

Outside of his injury in the last game of Spring Training, there were some alarming things about Mac Williamson’s offense this Spring. First, he had the worst slash line in Spring Training for his career. Secondly, his strikeout totals are way up from any other year. For someone who has bounced back from a concussion and is looking to prove something this season, he has not shown a lot of promise. He did start out slowly this Spring, but his numbers did not really pick up. Last Spring Training he posted some of his best numbers after changing his approach at the plate, but it might start looking more and more like a fluke as the games go by. Then again, his inability to stay healthy isn’t doing him any favors either.

Steven Duggar

2019 Spring Training: .333/.396/.438, 0 HR, 2 RBI, 11 SO, 5 BB
Average Spring Training: .284/.371/.457, 1 HR, 3 RBI, 9 SO, 4 BB

Although the power numbers weren’t quite what they were last Spring, Duggar had a pretty successful month of March. So well in fact that he’s cemented himself as the starting centerfielder, a far cry from last season when the Giants were convinced they could tide up with Austin Jackson, Gorkys Hernandez and Gregor Blanco. Much like a few of his lineup mates, he’s going to need to stay healthy if he plans on contributing anything positive to the team. His main focus is to simply worry about getting on-base and letting Panik move him over.

Gerardo Parra

2019 Spring Training: .341/.388/.614, 2 HR, 6 RBI, 9 SO, 2 BB
Average Spring Training: .304/.359/.457, 1 HR, 7 RBI, 8 SO, 4 BB

Coming in as a very welcome addition to a depleted outfield, Gerardo Parra shined in Spring Training. This is by no doubt one of Parra’s best Spring Trainings, next to 2017. Of course, 2017 ended up being one of his best statistical seasons but was hampered by a strained right quad. If he can stay healthy, which he did last season, he can provide the Giants with great gap-to-gap hitting as well as good defensive range and a pretty good arm. He can definitely benefit the team on both sides of the ball, and he should.

Next. Is this Mac Williamson's last go around?

Madison Bumgarner

2019 Spring Training: 1-3, 8.27 ERA, 1.79 WHIP, 20 K, 2 BB
Average Spring Training: 1-1, 4.27 ERA, 1.29 WHIP, 19 K, 4 BB

I was hesitant to include a starting pitcher, or really any pitcher, but Madison Bumgarner’s Spring numbers made my eyebrows raise quite a bit. Although the numbers were bad, they certainly weren’t his worst. But here’s an interesting factoid: his worst Spring Training (2016) did not translate into a bad Regular Season. In fact, 2016 was arguably one of his best seasons on record, finishing with a season-high 251 strikeouts and a season-low 2.74 ERA. Now, the problem is going to come down to health. Like a broken record with everyone else in this locker room, Bumgarner needs to find a way to avoid the injury bug. The Giants are trusting him with the top of the rotation, and I really don’t think he’s going to let anyone down, especially since he becomes a free agent after the season.

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