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SF Giants History

San Francisco Giants Madness Is Back with a World Series Twist

KANSAS CITY, MO - OCTOBER 29: Buster Posey #28 and Madison Bumgarner #40 of the San Francisco Giants celebrate after defeating the Kansas City Royals to win Game Seven of the 2014 World Series by a score of 3-2 at Kauffman Stadium on October 29, 2014 in Kansas City, Missouri. (Photo by Jamie Squire/Getty Images)
KANSAS CITY, MO - OCTOBER 29: Buster Posey #28 and Madison Bumgarner #40 of the San Francisco Giants celebrate after defeating the Kansas City Royals to win Game Seven of the 2014 World Series by a score of 3-2 at Kauffman Stadium on October 29, 2014 in Kansas City, Missouri. (Photo by Jamie Squire/Getty Images)
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SAN FRANCISCO, CA – OCTOBER 22: Marco Scutaro #19 of the San Francisco Giants holds up the MVP trophy after the Giants defeat the St. Louis Cardinals 9-0 in Game Seven of the National League Championship Series at AT&T Park on October 22, 2012 in San Francisco, California. (Photo by David J. Phillip/Pool/Getty Images)
SAN FRANCISCO, CA – OCTOBER 22: Marco Scutaro #19 of the San Francisco Giants holds up the MVP trophy after the Giants defeat the St. Louis Cardinals 9-0 in Game Seven of the National League Championship Series at AT&T Park on October 22, 2012 in San Francisco, California. (Photo by David J. Phillip/Pool/Getty Images)

Freddy Sanchez and Jake Peavy (#12 Seeds)

Freddy Sanchez was one of several veterans who became part of the infamous band of castoffs and misfits. Like many other Giants that season, Sanchez was fighting to make the post season for the first time in his career. When he finally reached October baseball, he took full advantage. He set a record for doubles in the NLDS, and his bat and glove were on full display at both the top of the lineup and in the infield.

Peavy, like Hudson, became a big part of the 2014 rotation, but it wasn’t as big as they had hoped. That being said, Peavy’s veteran presence and leadership were evident throughout the run and included a dynamic performance in the NLDS against the Washington Nationals.

Juan Uribe and Cody Ross (#11 Seeds)

Juan Uribe was another veteran on the 2010 team, and his contributions to the October run seems legendary at this point. Besides the game winning home run in Game 6 of the NLCS, his runs batted in seemed to always come when the team needed them most. His numbers were staggering as he had only seven hits, but nine RBI’s along with 13 strikeouts. His numbers were as crazy as the fans were after this blast in Game 2 of the World Series.

Cody Ross had a forgetful regular season after being added to the Giants late in August. However, once the calendar turned to October, so did Ross’ production. He dominated the NLDS and NLCS and won MVP. His bat sparked a Giants offense throughout October and into the World Series. It was one of the most unexpected runs in the entire era.

Marco Scutaro and Edgar Renteria (#10 Seeds)

Scutaro won MVP in the 2012 NLCS, hitting .500 for the series. He was a hitting machine who never struck out from the moment he was traded to the Giants in July of that year. His NLCS was even more memorable because of the controversial collision with Matt Holliday and the subsequent hitting barrage that came after. When it began to rain during Game 7 and Scutaro looked to the heavens, it became a signature moment in the season. For him to catch the final out in that shower seemed fitting.

Renteria started this era with his MVP campaign in the 2010 World Series. His home run off Cliff Lee to break the scoreless tie in Game 5 might be the greatest moment of the five year run. For a team with a drought of over 50 seasons without a World Series, it is hard to describe in just a few sentences how much his home run meant to the organization and the fans.

Gregor Blanco and Aubrey Huff (#9 Seeds)

Blanco never seemed to win the starting job in the outfield during the regular season, but seemed to take the job over once October rolled around. In both 2012 and 2014, his defense became a key part of both championships. While he will forever be remembered best for his perfect catch to preserve Cain’s perfect game, his glove was just as special in the playoffs.

Aubrey Huff was just another castoff when he arrived in 2010, but for a team full of guys no other team wanted, he was the bat in the middle of the order. He led the 2010 Giants in most offensive categories and he led a clubhouse that needed someone to handle all the personalities. From Huff’s rally thong to his bat on game day, there is no forgetting Huff’s impact on the first championship. And who could forget his first career home run as a Giant.

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