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Buster Posey

San Francisco Giants: Four Questions Every GM Candidate Must Answer

SAN FRANCISCO, CA - OCTOBER 10: Madison Bumgarner #40 of the San Francisco Giants speaks with Buster Posey #28 during Game Three of their National League Division Series against the Chicago Cubs at AT&T Park on October 10, 2016 in San Francisco, California. (Photo by Ezra Shaw/Getty Images)
SAN FRANCISCO, CA - OCTOBER 10: Madison Bumgarner #40 of the San Francisco Giants speaks with Buster Posey #28 during Game Three of their National League Division Series against the Chicago Cubs at AT&T Park on October 10, 2016 in San Francisco, California. (Photo by Ezra Shaw/Getty Images) /
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SAN FRANCISCO, CA – OCTOBER 11: Brandon Crawford #35 and Joe Panik #12 of the San Francisco Giants stand on the field during a pitching change in the ninth inning of Game Four of their National League Division Series at AT&T Park on October 11, 2016 in San Francisco, California. (Photo by Ezra Shaw/Getty Images)
SAN FRANCISCO, CA – OCTOBER 11: Brandon Crawford #35 and Joe Panik #12 of the San Francisco Giants stand on the field during a pitching change in the ninth inning of Game Four of their National League Division Series at AT&T Park on October 11, 2016 in San Francisco, California. (Photo by Ezra Shaw/Getty Images) /

After the GM’s are asked about the San Francisco Giants Hall of Fame battery, they will need to address the infield.

Brandon Belt, Joe Panik, Brandon Crawford and Evan Longoria are all facing uncertain futures for different reasons.

Belt, Crawford and Longoria are all signed to long term deals. There are limits to how many teams would even be interested in trading for them with the money they are still owed.

Panik, who is still in arbitration, had a difficult year and may be a question mark to remain an everyday player.

The team may look to trade Belt to clear room for Posey at first base.

They may trade Panik as well to a team who thinks he can still be the gold glove second baseman. He showed an ability to hit over .300 in 2015, yet he has become a .277 career hitter after some injury plagued seasons and his value has dropped as a result.

Crawford is the most likely to stay because of his elite glove, but if the next GM commits to a full rebuild, he may be moved for prospects.

Longoria has the longest financial commitment as he will not be a free agent until after the 2022 season. If the Giants do want to turn this roster upside down, they may try to move Longo to clear payroll and create flexibility.

The infield under performed in 2018 and when a player doesn’t perform to their baseball card, it limits the trade options for the next person in charge.

How the next boss will determine how best to navigate the infield will be crucial in fixing a lineup that was dreadful the last two seasons.

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