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Five Biggest “What-Ifs” of the SF Giants 2020 Season

A dejected Austin Slater after striking out to end the SF Giants season. (Photo by Lachlan Cunningham/Getty Images)
A dejected Austin Slater after striking out to end the SF Giants season. (Photo by Lachlan Cunningham/Getty Images)
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Trevor Gott, SF Giants
Trevor Gott struggled all season for the SF Giants and had a number of bad outings at inopportune times. (Photo by Jason O. Watson/Getty Images)

Five Biggest “What-Ifs” of the SF Giants 2020 Season
2. Trevor Gott’s fifth and sixth save opportunities

We knew it had to be here. Most people are probably surprised not to see it at the top of the list.

Trevor Gott entered the season as one of the Giants top high-leverage options. Gott received the opportunity to close out the teams’ first four opportunities and recorded all four saves. After that… well you know.

It all started on the first day of a 10 games in 10 days stretch of play. The Giants held a five-run lead and chose to go to Gott. The move didn’t make sense from a rest management or a role consistency standpoint, but it shouldn’t have made a difference with a 5-run lead.

Instead, everything fell apart. Gott, with help from his defense, blew the lead.

Yet, after throwing over 30 pitches against the Oakland Athletics the day before, Kapler sent Gott back to the mound the next day for his fifth save opportunity of the year. He not only threw nearly 30 pitches again, Gott once again lost the lead.

Sadly, that wasn’t all. With just one day of rest, Kapler went back to Gott for the third time in four days in another save situation. This time, facing off against the Los Angeles Angels, Gott blew his final save of the season, eventually surrendering a walk-off home run to Tommy La Stella.

The decisions left many fans without any trust left in Kapler.

What makes the decisions to return to Gott so insistently was how well-rested the remaining members of the bullpen were. The Giants had a rare off day built into their schedule. Instead, Kapler seemed to keep doubling down to justify the original move, which only hurt himself, the team, and Gott.

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