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SF Giants Prospects

Do any Giants prospects deserve an early extension?

Joey Bart spent an extended portion of 2019 in the California League where Jen Ramos got to see the SF Giants prospect up close. (Photo by Jamie Schwaberow/Getty Images)
Joey Bart spent an extended portion of 2019 in the California League where Jen Ramos got to see the SF Giants prospect up close. (Photo by Jamie Schwaberow/Getty Images) /
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Heliot Ramos

Almost every reason and rationale you use on Joey Bart can be applied to outfielder Heliot Ramos as well.

He is coming off a 2019 campaign in which he hit .290 with 16 home runs, 55 RBI, and eight stolen bases between High-A and Double-A.

What Ramos does have over Bart is more experience in the minor leagues. The 2019 season was his third season year in the Giants’ system.

He has already proven to be an extra-base hit machine, driving the ball over the fence and routinely finding the gaps.

The only worry some might have is his age. He just turned 20 in September, and he is clearly still developing his overall game.

Ramos had a slash line of .348/.404/.645  in rookie ball in 2017. Following his promotion to Single-A in 2018, he showed regression as he adapted and only posted a .245/.313/.396 line.

This past season, he raked to the tune of a .306/.385/.500 line at High-A San Jose, but crashed back to earth a bit following a promotion to Double-A, where he hit just .242/.321/.421 in 25 games.

To earn a chance to discuss a long-term deal with the team, Ramos will need to prove he can adapt to top-level pitching quickly and hit against major league talent consistently. At the earliest, that would come after the 2020 season, but given his age, the Giants may take their time in letting Ramos develop.

Ramos and Bart are on track to play at Triple-A in 2020, if not earn time with the big club, but both are still on the accelerated learning track and need to prove they can adapt to major league pitching as they grow.

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