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Giants: Five players who won’t be on the Opening Day roster

PHOENIX, AZ - APRIL 02: Madison Bumgarner #40 of the San Francisco Giants high fives Brandon Belt #9 after Bumgarner hit a solo home run against the Arizona Diamondbacks during the fifth inning of the MLB opening day game at Chase Field on April 2, 2017 in Phoenix, Arizona. (Photo by Christian Petersen/Getty Images)
PHOENIX, AZ - APRIL 02: Madison Bumgarner #40 of the San Francisco Giants high fives Brandon Belt #9 after Bumgarner hit a solo home run against the Arizona Diamondbacks during the fifth inning of the MLB opening day game at Chase Field on April 2, 2017 in Phoenix, Arizona. (Photo by Christian Petersen/Getty Images)
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San Francisco Giants
SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA – SEPTEMBER 27: Evan Longoria #10 of the San Francisco Giants looks on against the Los Angeles Dodgers during their MLB game at Oracle Park on September 27, 2019 in San Francisco, California. (Photo by Robert Reiners/Getty Images)

3B Evan Longoria

Ahh, Evan Longoria. This trade was probably one of the dumbest made by Bobby Evans outside of the Andrew McCutchen deal. Coincidence that both of those trades happened in the same offseason? I think not.

Evans felt pressure in not getting Giancarlo Stanton to the bay, and he pulled the trigger on two terrible trades. This one not so much for what the Giants lost in the trade, but more for the contract and money they added to the payroll.

It was a bad move in hindsight, and that’s exactly why the Tampa Bay Rays were willing to part with him. Now, the Giants are saddled with his contract, and outside of Buster Posey, it’s the longest deal on the books at the moment.

While Longoria played much better for the Giants in 2019, he was still far from his prime form. A 101 wRC+ represented a marked improvement over the 87 wRC+ he posted in 2018, but his $17 million AAV still made him vastly overpaid.

They already have an above-average defender an average offensive contributor in Brandon Belt at the other infielder corner. So nearly $34 million a year for two average players at premium offensive positions? Less than ideal.

Despite his average production, Longoria’s veteran presence might help pave the way for a trade.

He was an Angels fan growing up, and the impetus behind their signing of Joe Maddon to the manager’s spot shows they’re going to get after it in building a competitive roster.

They badly need a good third baseman, and Longoria is just that. He’s still owed nearly $50 million, so if the Giants threw in some cash, they might get the deal done.

Better yet, they could work some more of the magic that somehow allowed them to be rid of Mark Melancon’s entire remaining contract in a deadline trade with the Atlanta Braves.

Longoria or the next player on this list will be part of trade discussions all offseason. I’ll give a guarantee that at least one of them goes.

As for who the next pick is to not be on the roster? Let the Belt wars begin.

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