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Giants roundtable: Should Kevin Pillar be re-signed or non-tendered?

SAN FRANCISCO, CA - SEPTEMBER 09: Kevin Pillar #1 of the San Francisco Giants slides to score at home plate during the sixth inning against the Pittsburgh Pirates at Oracle Park on September 9, 2019 in San Francisco, California. (Photo by Stephen Lam/Getty Images)
SAN FRANCISCO, CA - SEPTEMBER 09: Kevin Pillar #1 of the San Francisco Giants slides to score at home plate during the sixth inning against the Pittsburgh Pirates at Oracle Park on September 9, 2019 in San Francisco, California. (Photo by Stephen Lam/Getty Images)
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SAN FRANCISCO, CA – AUGUST 07: Kevin Pillar #1 of the San Francisco Giants rounds third base to score against the Washington Nationals in the bottom of the ninth inning at Oracle Park on August 7, 2019 in San Francisco, California. The Nationals won the game 4-1. (Photo by Thearon W. Henderson/Getty Images)
SAN FRANCISCO, CA – AUGUST 07: Kevin Pillar #1 of the San Francisco Giants rounds third base to score against the Washington Nationals in the bottom of the ninth inning at Oracle Park on August 7, 2019 in San Francisco, California. The Nationals won the game 4-1. (Photo by Thearon W. Henderson/Getty Images)

Written by: Marc Delucchi

When it comes to Pillar I have to ask myself at what number would this be a no-brainer?

To me, if Pillar’s arbitration number was closer to what it was last year (about $6 million), this would be easy.

I’m very confident in Pillar’s ability to be worth about 1 WAR next season. Of course, Pillar’s estimated arbitration salary is actually going to be about $10 million. The economist in me doesn’t like committing to an obvious overpay, but the alternatives aren’t particularly appealing.

While I am confident in Zaidi’s ability to find more options from the rough, like Alex Dickerson, Jaylin Davis, and Mike Yastrzemski, I do not know how much they can rely on that.

Furthermore, there is a dearth of center field options in this year’s free-agent class. Normally, a two-year extension at a lower average salary would make sense, but I’m not that keen on a long-term commitment to Pillar.

I would try to offer Pillar a one-year, $8 million contract with a second-year club option of $8 million that includes a $2 million buyout. That would guarantee Pillar $10 million, give the Giants the flexibility to let him go next season, and leave a bit of upside for the team if Pillar takes a jump.

If he declines that proposal, I would still tender him a contract.

Even as tentative as I am, the Giants shouldn’t be making every decision on the value of every marginal dollar. The team’s payroll is historically low and there are no long-term risks.

Next. Selecting the 2010s All-Decade Team

Our three writers are all in agreement. What do you think the San Francisco Giants should do? Let us know in the comments below and on our Twitter page.

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