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SF Giants Prospects

San Francisco Giants: Midseason Top 30 Prospects (Nos. 10-1)

Joey Bart spent an extended portion of 2019 in the California League where Jen Ramos got to see the SF Giants prospect up close. (Photo by Jamie Schwaberow/Getty Images)
Joey Bart spent an extended portion of 2019 in the California League where Jen Ramos got to see the SF Giants prospect up close. (Photo by Jamie Schwaberow/Getty Images)
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10. LHP Seth Corry

Age: 20
Current Level: Single-A
Acquired: Draft (2017, 3rd Round)
Future Value Grade: 40+

After selecting Heliot Ramos in the first round of the 2017 draft, the San Francisco Giants reached for Jacob Gonzalez in the second round. They signed Gonzalez to a below-slot deal and used the savings to pull Corry away from a BYU commitment.

While Gonzalez’s development has stalled substantially—he’s not even ranked in the top 30—Corry has turned into one of the best pitching prospects in the system.

As a prep in Utah, Corry drew comparisons to a young Matt Moore. Back then, he was a two-pitch pitcher where he worked off a 90-92 mph fastball and a curveball with advanced feel that projected as a plus pitch.

He’s since added a changeup that has a chance to be an average pitch. While his fastball bottoms out at 90 mph, he can reach back for a little more and touch 95 mph occasionally. His curveball remains his best pitch.

Over his minor-league career, Corry has missed plenty of bats with 178 strikeouts in 152 innings, and he has limited hard contact with only 110 hits and five home runs allowed. However, severe control issues have hampered his progression and he’s walked 97 batters for a 5.7 BB/9 rate.

Corry has always had a better handle on his off-speed pitches than his fastball, which makes me bullish on his ability to eventually control all his pitches. His control has progressed as the 2019 season has gone on. In his last five starts, he’s thrown 24.2 innings, striking out 29 while allowing just four earned runs and, most importantly, only seven walks.

His three-pitch repertoire gives him the potential to be a strong middle-of-the-rotation arm. If he maintains his development into the second half, he’ll be set up to begin 2020 at High-A San Jose.

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