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SF Giants Prospects

San Francisco Giants: Midseason Top 30 Prospects (Nos. 20-11)

SCOTTSDALE, AZ - FEBRUARY 21: Zach Green #76 of the San Francisco Giants poses during the Giants Photo Day on February 21, 2019 in Scottsdale, Arizona. (Photo by Jamie Schwaberow/Getty Images)
SCOTTSDALE, AZ - FEBRUARY 21: Zach Green #76 of the San Francisco Giants poses during the Giants Photo Day on February 21, 2019 in Scottsdale, Arizona. (Photo by Jamie Schwaberow/Getty Images)
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San Francisco Giants
SCOTTSDALE, AZ – FEBRUARY 21: Zach Green #76 of the San Francisco Giants poses during the Giants Photo Day on February 21, 2019 in Scottsdale, Arizona. (Photo by Jamie Schwaberow/Getty Images)

The San Francisco Giants farm system will be under a microscope in the years to come while the MLB squad continues to rebuild.

Here at the beginning of July, the San Francisco Giants have exhausted all of their draft pool money, and most of their international free agency pool as well while adding a wealth of young talent to the farm system.

While the trade deadline will likely bring another influx of prospect talent, ATF contributor Marc Delucchi will dedicate the holiday weekend to taking inventory of the farm system.

He kicked things off on Friday by releasing the site’s official top 10 prospect list alongside a Q&A with ATF site expert Joel Reuter, released scouting reports for his No. 30 to 21-ranked prospects on Saturday.

Each prospect in our top 30 rankings will receive a grade on the 20-80 scale. For those not familiar with the scale, check out this primer. Here’s a quick rundown for reference:

80: Top 5 player in baseball (8+ WAR)
70: Top 10 player in the baseball (5-8 WAR)
60: All-Star (3.5-5 WAR)
55: Above-average everyday player (2.5-3.5 WAR)
50: Average everyday player (1.5-2.5 WAR)
45: Platoon player (0.5-1.5 WAR)
40: MLB backup (0.2-0.5 WAR)
35: Quad-A player (0-0.2 WAR)
30: Triple-A Player
20: Organization player

Two important notes:

1. The grades next to the players are the current expected values, meaning you can think of those grades as the 50% outcome. Obviously, most prospects have a wide range of potential outcomes and the grades are an attempt to quantify the average expected outcome.

2. Some players will have grades with + signs next to them (40+, 45+, etc.). This has to do with the way player grades work. Probably 60-80% of top 30 prospects in each organization fall somewhere from the 40-50 grades. So it can be really redundant and difficult to differentiate prospect No. 11 from No. 23. Part of this is on purpose, but some 40-grade players are closer to moving up to a 45-grade than others. Hence, the plus. A strong second-half from a 45+ player will almost definitely jump them up to a 50 grade. Same with a 40+ player going to 45. You get the idea.

With that out of the way, let’s pick up where we left off with the San Francisco Giants top prospects, continuing with No. 20 and counting up to No. 11 in the second edition of what will be a three-part series.

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