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SF Giants Prospects

San Francisco Giants: 5500 Words on the 2019 MLB Draft

2019 SF Giants 1st-round pick, Hunter Bishop, right, celebrates with Michael Gasper of the Brewster Whitecaps during game one of the Cape Cod League Championship Series. (Photo by Maddie Meyer/Getty Images)
2019 SF Giants 1st-round pick, Hunter Bishop, right, celebrates with Michael Gasper of the Brewster Whitecaps during game one of the Cape Cod League Championship Series. (Photo by Maddie Meyer/Getty Images) /
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8 of 10

21st round (626th overall) Oregon State RHP Bryce Fehmel
22nd round (656th overall) Southern U A&M (LA) CF Javeyan Williams
23rd round (686th overall) UC-Irvine RHP Taylor Rashi
24th round (716th overall) Florida Gulf Coast RHP Evan Lumbert
25th round (746th overall) Pro Baseball HS & Academy 2B Richard D. Rodriguez
26th round (776th overall) Long Beach State RHP Nick Avila
27th round (806th overall) Owasso HS (OK) SS Connor Beichler
28th round (836th overall) Noblesville HS (IN) RHP Reese Sharp
29th round (866th overall) Clemson RHP Brooks Crawford
30th round (896th overall) UNC Wilmington RHP Justin Crump

Only six of the Giants first 20 selections were pitchers and they made up for that here, selecting a number of finesse redshirt-junior starting pitchers. Fehmel was an incredibly effective starter for the Beavers over his career, working with below-average stuff, but plus command. Williams is another fast outfielder (77 steals in four seasons) who made it onto Sports Center with a highlight grab earlier this year.

Rashi has a deceptive delivery that helps him maintain effectiveness with a fastball that tops out at 88 mph. He closed this season for Irvine but has been effective in the rotation. Lumbert came into the year with the potential to be a top-end senior sign, but took a step back. He has sat in the low-90s with average secondary pitches in the past but has really struggled with consistency.

Rodriguez is a bat first, second-base-only prospect who has put up some intriguing exit velocities. It’s unclear where his commitment is or how signable he will be. Avila transferred from San Joaquin Delta JC and was an effective innings eater for LBSU without any standout traits.

Beichler begins a trend that will become even more apparent on the next slide. He ranks as one of the better recruits in the country and seems to be a strong commitment to Oklahoma. Depending on how much money the Giants have left over after signing McDonald, they may be able to get a deal done, but that seems unlikely.

Sharp is a two-way commit to Indiana who likely only has pro potential on the mound where he has touched the low-90s. He isn’t as touted as Beichler and may be more signable, but there are no reports to suggest anything in either direction.

Crawford had a really strong career at Clemson before a disappointing senior season. He has low-90s velocity with a power curve and he pitches to contact. Crump approached 90 mph as a prep but was unable to show consistency at Wilmington. He worked out of the bullpen this year and will likely have to show enough to earn another chance to start.

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