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SF Giants History

Writer’s Roundtable: Who makes the franchise Mount Rushmore?

ATLANTA - OCTOBER 2: Left fielder Barry Bonds #25 of the San Francisco Giants waits for his at bat in the on-deck circle during in Game one of the National League Divisional Series against the Atlanta Braves at Turner Field on October 2, 2002 in Atlanta, Georgia. The Giants won 8-5. (Photo by Jamie Squire/Getty Images)
ATLANTA - OCTOBER 2: Left fielder Barry Bonds #25 of the San Francisco Giants waits for his at bat in the on-deck circle during in Game one of the National League Divisional Series against the Atlanta Braves at Turner Field on October 2, 2002 in Atlanta, Georgia. The Giants won 8-5. (Photo by Jamie Squire/Getty Images)
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San Francisco Giants
SAN FRANCISCO, CA – SEPTEMBER 28: Tim Lincecum #55 of the San Francisco Giants follows through on a pitch against the San Diego Padres in the fourth inning at AT&T Park on September 28, 2014 in San Francisco, California. (Photo by Brian Bahr/Getty Images)

Tim Lincecum (2 votes)

Matthew Oscodar: This is a biased choice. Tim Lincecum is the reason I became a pitcher in my real baseball career and was truly my idol. I grew my hair out like him, I did my best to imitate his motion, and I always wanted to wear #55. Even though he had quite the fall from grace, at his peak, I have never seen someone dominate the way he did.

Steve Klein: I had to include a favorite player of recent times, so I went for Tim Lincecum, whose achievements seem amplified because he was such an unlikely hero. He was tough, freaky powerful, fun to watch and an absolutely integral part of the most successful period in the Giants’ San Francisco chapter.

Christy Mathewson (2 votes)

Hiren Patel: Jumping way back to the turn of the 20th century, Mathewson is a player nobody reading this has ever seen play. However, his numbers speak for themselves. Over 17 years with the New York Giants, he established himself as the franchise leader in virtually every major category—wins (372), ERA (2.12), WAR (97.9), WHIP (1.057), strikeouts (2504), and innings pitched (4779.2). Mathewson was the best pitcher in the league when he was active.

Joel Reuter: Anyone who thinks Madison Bumgarner’s performance during the 2014 World Series was the best ever by a pitcher should take a look back at what Mathewson did during the 1905 World Series. He started three games and pitched three complete-game shutouts, allowing 13 hits and one walk in his 27 innings of work. He’s one of the five greatest pitchers to ever play the game and should be a no-brainer selection.

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