SF Giants History

Writer’s Roundtable: Who makes the franchise Mount Rushmore?

By Joel Reuter
ATLANTA - OCTOBER 2: Left fielder Barry Bonds #25 of the San Francisco Giants waits for his at bat in the on-deck circle during in Game one of the National League Divisional Series against the Atlanta Braves at Turner Field on October 2, 2002 in Atlanta, Georgia. The Giants won 8-5. (Photo by Jamie Squire/Getty Images)
ATLANTA - OCTOBER 2: Left fielder Barry Bonds #25 of the San Francisco Giants waits for his at bat in the on-deck circle during in Game one of the National League Divisional Series against the Atlanta Braves at Turner Field on October 2, 2002 in Atlanta, Georgia. The Giants won 8-5. (Photo by Jamie Squire/Getty Images) /
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Willie McCovey (4 votes)

Haille Saal: McCovey is another obvious choice and a fan-favorite to this day. He ranks seventh in all-time home runs with 521 and holds the record at Candlestick Park with 231. My goal was to pick two more current players and two more historic players. Mays and McCovey are in the Hall of Fame, Bumgarner is on his way, and Bonds should be there already.

Joel Reuter: McCovey led the NL in home runs three times and won NL MVP in 1969 when he hit .320/.453/.656 with 45 home runs and 126 RBI. He hit 469 of his 521 career home runs over the course of his 19 seasons in a Giants uniform and was inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1986.

Matthew Oscodar: “Stretch” was one of the best first basemen of all time and a Giants legend. I was not able to watch him either, but from what I’ve seen, he had a sweet lefty swing and flat-out crushed the ball. May he rest in peace.

Nick San Miguel: Mays and McCovey are pretty self-explanatory. Both are Giant legends and both are Hall of Famers. It’s a shame neither was able to bring a title to San Francisco, but both will be synonymous with the Giants for eternity.

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