Fansided
SF Giants History

Writer’s Roundtable: Who makes the franchise Mount Rushmore?

ATLANTA - OCTOBER 2: Left fielder Barry Bonds #25 of the San Francisco Giants waits for his at bat in the on-deck circle during in Game one of the National League Divisional Series against the Atlanta Braves at Turner Field on October 2, 2002 in Atlanta, Georgia. The Giants won 8-5. (Photo by Jamie Squire/Getty Images)
ATLANTA - OCTOBER 2: Left fielder Barry Bonds #25 of the San Francisco Giants waits for his at bat in the on-deck circle during in Game one of the National League Divisional Series against the Atlanta Braves at Turner Field on October 2, 2002 in Atlanta, Georgia. The Giants won 8-5. (Photo by Jamie Squire/Getty Images) /
facebooktwitterreddit
3 of 6
San Francisco Giants
28 Sep 2001: Barry Bonds #25 of the San Francisco Giants watches his 68th home run sail over the centerfield wall during the 2nd inning against the San Diego Padres at Pacific Bell Park in San Francisco, California. DIGITAL IMAGE. Mandatory Credit: Harry How/ALLSPORT /

Barry Bonds (6 votes)

Haille Saal: Bonds is one of the main reasons I became a passionate Giants fan growing up. My family and I would go to games and sit in left field—the closest we could get to Bonds. Aside from being the all-time home run leader, he also has the most career walks since pitchers were terrified to throw to him. Not only was he an offensive powerhouse, but he was also awarded eight Gold Glove awards. He also stole 514 bases and is the only player in MLB history with more than 500 home runs and 500 steals. There will always be controversy surrounding Bonds, but what was he accused of? All charges were dropped in the allegations against him for using steroids. That’s it, that’s the end of the argument. He belongs in the Hall of Fame.

Hiren Patel: My first pick is also the only member of my Mount Rushmore I’ve seen play. Bonds is MLB’s all-time leader in home runs, walks and MVPs. He starred on the Giants for 15 years and brought a level of excitement to the fans perhaps only matched by winning the World Series. Fun fact: Bonds is responsible for 35 of the 78 of the splash hits into McCovey Cove, despite only suiting up for eight of the 19 seasons at Oracle Park.

Joel Reuter: Bonds cheated. Turn a blind eye if you want, but he did. That said, he’s also a prominent part of the baseball story, and perhaps the biggest reason that baseball is still in San Francisco. Forget the home runs or a second, his .609 on-base percentage in 2004 is something we’ll never see again.

Matthew Oscodar: I have never seen pitchers be so afraid of an opposing hitter. Say what you will about the steroids, they do not help you square up a baseball. He could have been a first ballot Hall of Famer if he fell off the face of the Earth before his head started getting bigger. He had a 1.045 OPS and 28 home runs in his final season in 2007. Bring him back?

Nick San Miguel: Bonds obviously carries baggage. He totally took ‘roids and is pretty obviously a jerk, but that doesn’t mean we can’t love him. He’s a big reason the Giants are still in San Francisco and he electrified a fan base in a new ballpark. We may have to carve an asterisk next to him, but no Giants Mount Rushmore would be complete without him.

Steve Klein: Barry Bonds is an obvious choice. He was also the main reason I became a Giants fan, and was by some margin the game’s most engaging player in the mid-90’s when I fell in love with the sport. His mind-boggling feats of hitting prowess earn him a place among the greatest the sport has ever seen,  let alone one made exclusively of Giants legends.

facebooktwitterreddit