SF Giants History

San Francisco Giants Madness: 9-12 Seeds Announced

By Michael Saltzman
Apr 6, 2016; Milwaukee, WI, USA; San Francisco Giants right fielder Hunter Pence (8) makes a diving catch of ball hit by Milwaukee Brewers second baseman Aaron Hill (not pictured) in the second inning at Miller Park. Mandatory Credit: Benny Sieu-USA TODAY Sports
Apr 6, 2016; Milwaukee, WI, USA; San Francisco Giants right fielder Hunter Pence (8) makes a diving catch of ball hit by Milwaukee Brewers second baseman Aaron Hill (not pictured) in the second inning at Miller Park. Mandatory Credit: Benny Sieu-USA TODAY Sports /
facebooktwitterreddit
5 of 5
AT&T Park
The Giants will play three against the Colorado Rockies at AT&T Park over the weekend. Photo courtesy of Mark O’Neill /

More from Around the Foghorn

9 Seeds:

Mike McCormick

Mike McCormick pitched 11 seasons for the Giants, including the last two in New York. From 1958-1962, McCormick was mostly a starter and made two All-Star games in 1960 and 1961. After the 1962 World Series, McCormick and Miller were traded to Baltimore. McCormick did return to the Giants however in 1967 and had his best season in the Major Leagues. McCormick would win the Cy Young that season, going 22-10, with a 2.85 ERA and 1.147 WHIP. Over his Giants career, he won 107 games and maintained a 3.68 ERA.

John Montefusco

John “The Count” Montefusco won Rookie of the Year in 1975, going 15-9 with a 2.88 ERA. Montefusco was an All-Star the following season. His first two full seasons led to back to back six win seasons, according to WAR. The way he burst onto the scene is still one of the most memorable debuts in team history. To put his debut in another context, only Tim Lincecum had a better start to his career in San Francisco Giants history. From 1974-1980, The Count won 59 games while maintaining a 3.47 ERA, but it will always be his first two seasons that keeps him on this list of greatest Giants.

Vida Blue

Before Vida Blue was encouraging Giants fans to donate their car to the Junior Giants and doing pre and post game analysis with former Giant Bill Laskey, Vida was one of the most dominant pitchers in baseball.  Blue won both the Rookie of the Year and Cy Young in 1971. After nine dominant seasons that included three straight World Series championships, Vida was traded to the Giants. It was an incredible eight player trade sent seven to Oakland along with $300,000 for Vida Blue. To put that in perspective, Vida only earned $200,000 in his first season with the Giants in 1978. The six time All-Star went to three Midsummer Classic games with the Giants. In his six seasons with the orange and black, Blue won 72 games and maintained a 3.52 ERA. In 17 seasons, he won 209 games and earned an ERA of 3.27.

Brett Butler

Brett Butler was the prototypical leadoff hitter for the Giants. In just three seasons, Butler left a mark on Giants history. From his oversized glove in center, to his bunt singles to start a rally, Butler did everything you’d want from the guy at the top of your order. He has his best season of his career in his first season with the Giants at the age of 31. He played to a near 7 win season, according to WAR (6.8.) Despite a drop off in 1989, he still led the Giants lineup that made it all the way to the World Series. After another strong season in 1990, Butler signed with the Los Angeles Dodgers as a free agent. Despite signing with the team’s arch rival, there is no denying that he was a talented and productive center fielder for the orange and black.

#SFGiantsMadness will begin March 16 and 17 to coincide with the NCAA March Madness games. Be sure to go to Twitter and vote for your favorite San Francisco Giants.

Next: Giants Announce First Wave of Spring Pitching Appearances

Use the hashtag #SFGiantsMadness to search for all of the match-ups throughout March and April.

facebooktwitterreddit