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San Francisco Giants: Alternatives to the Free Agent Closers

Sep 7, 2016; Denver, CO, USA; San Francisco Giants manager Bruce Bochy (15) signals in the eighth inning against the Colorado Rockies at Coors Field. Mandatory Credit: Isaiah J. Downing-USA TODAY Sports
Sep 7, 2016; Denver, CO, USA; San Francisco Giants manager Bruce Bochy (15) signals in the eighth inning against the Colorado Rockies at Coors Field. Mandatory Credit: Isaiah J. Downing-USA TODAY Sports /
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Sep 6, 2016; Chicago, IL, USA; Chicago White Sox relief pitcher David Robertson (30) reacts after delivering a final out against the Detroit Tigers during the ninth inning at U.S. Cellular Field. The White Sox won 2-0. Mandatory Credit: Kamil Krzaczynski-USA TODAY Sports
Sep 6, 2016; Chicago, IL, USA; Chicago White Sox relief pitcher David Robertson (30) reacts after delivering a final out against the Detroit Tigers during the ninth inning at U.S. Cellular Field. The White Sox won 2-0. Mandatory Credit: Kamil Krzaczynski-USA TODAY Sports /

Alternative Closer Option No. 3: Trade for David Robertson

The Giants need a closer. And when filling that role adequately, the phrase “any means necessary” comes to mind. They need to fill this role. And however they do it, doesn’t really matter from a baseball standpoint. So now we present the options to fill the role through the trade route. The first closer available via. trade that comes to mind is David Robertson of the Chicago White Sox.

The White Sox are terrible. In fact, they’re a pretty terribly run organization from top to bottom. They won’t be a contender next year, because they can’t get out of their own way. From clubhouse issues caused by upper management’s ego, to a spineless leader in the clubhouse, the White Sox are a mess. A losing/rebuilding team has no use for a closer, frankly. The Giants have significant use for a closer. Robertson is a good one.

In his last three years as a closer, he has registered above an 80% save success rate each year. on top of that, he had a 6.62 K/BB ratio in 2015 (!!!). That’s pretty ridiculous. For comparison, the Santiago Casilla never had above a 3.0 K/BB ratio in his time as a closer. Robertson is a definite upgrade at closer over whatever mess the Giants had this season. The biggest question on Robertson is how much would he cost?

Robertson’s current contract runs through the 2018 season, with 2017 being a $12million dollar contract with a $1million dollar escalation for 2018. I don’t think the situation he’s in with the club is at the point where the White Sox would chip in for his salary. However, they’re still paying Jake Peavy, so who knows. In terms of trade value, the White Sox would most likely ask for Chris Shaw, which wouldn’t be stupid. With Belt under contract long-term, the Giants may not hold Shaw in the highest regards as far as “off-limit prospects” go.

I think they’re probably more likely to keep ahold of Tyler Beede, Christian Arroyo, Heath Quinn, and Bryan Reynolds, as those three look like future big leaguers right away. However, Shaw was rated a top ten first base prospect in all of baseball. That’s pretty significant. I would be OK with parting with Shaw for Robertson, as long as Shaw is the centerpiece of the deal. Although, I’m just really not a fan of trading prospects that are within the upper levels of the organization and have had no chance in the big leagues. Alas, I’m not running the organization so I have no control over that. But that’s just one trade option for closer.

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